Architecture in Malta

Visit because

An extraordinary island in the Mediterranean Sea, the architecture of Malta reflects it's chequered history. With walled citadels and ports, beautiful Catholic churches, and significant WWII defences, there is significant historical architectural interest.

Malta is also home to some of the most ancient constructions know to man - the Megalithic temples scattered across the island are over 4000 years old.

Ħaġar Qim

HagarQim-entrance

The ancient Megalithic temples of Ħaġar Qim are some of the oldest structures known to man and are remarkably well preserved. Built of very large stones between 3600BC and 3200BC, the scale of the blockwork is a wonder to behold. The largest stone discovered in Megalithic Maltese architecture is found at the Ħaġar Qim temple complex – it stands 5.2m high.

Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni

Dating from 2500-3000BC, the Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni is the only known prehistoric underground temple in the world. A surprisingly sophisticated network of chambers carved and constructed of stone on multiple levels makes the hypogeum all the more extraordinary.

Rotunda of Mosta (Church of the Assumption of Our Lady)

Mosta-exterior

The dome of the rotunda is the fourth largest unsupported dome in the world. The building survived being hit by three bombs during WWII, one of which punctured the dome when the church was filled with people for evening mass, but did not explode.

Visit because

An extraordinary island in the Mediterranean Sea, the architecture of Malta reflects it's chequered history. With walled citadels and ports, beautiful Catholic churches, and significant WWII defences, there is significant historical architectural interest.

Malta is also home to some of the most ancient constructions know to man - the Megalithic temples scattered across the island are over 4000 years old.